Margin Notes

CRAFT STUDIO: EVERY LITTLE SCRAP AND WONDER BY CARLA FUNK

Aug
18

What I Was Reading:

As I neared the end of every little scrap and wonder by Carla Funk I came across yet another passage that at once transported my senses to the scene from the author’s childhood and into a memory of my own childhood. Her description of all the distinct gun noises that kids make while playing war were so perfect that I was simultaneously drawn into her narrative while re-living scenes from my youth. My mouth silently formed the noises she was describing, while my memory’s ears heard my childhood friends and I voicing the same array of gun noises.

every little scrap and wonder 2every little scrap and wonder 3

What Moves I Notice the Writer Making:

  • Specificity: The different gun noises are all linked to a specific gun.
  • Onomatopoeia: Descriptions of the noises use original onomatopoeia.
  • Functional description: By describing the gun’s firing mechanism, the reader is given a sense of the cadence the gun’s noise has.
  • Physical description: The reader is encouraged to try each sound as they read because the author describes how the mouth is shaped and which part of the vocal system is used for that sound.
  • Combinations: Most descriptions use a combination of multiple of the above-mentioned techniques in order to create a richer auditory description of the sounds.

Possibilities for Writers:

  • Brainstorm noises and create an original onomatopoeia for those noises.
  • Think of details you can include about how whatever is making the noise operates in order to give the audience a more complete picture of the sound.
  • Describe the physical shape of the mouth or use of the vocal system in a description of a noise someone is making.
  • Try to combine different noise descriptors to create a multi-faceted description of a noise.
  • Explore other ways of communicating sound through text (physical sensation of the sound waves, rhythm, font, spacing, metaphor etc.).

Guest writer Michael Reeder is currently in the UNB education program, hoping to teach English Language Arts to high school students soon. He has always loved reading and believes that, since reading is one of the most powerful tools and individual can use to advance their lives independently, instilling a love of reading in students is one of the most important things a teacher can do.

CRAFT STUDIO: WITH THE BEATLES BY HARUKI MURAKAMI

Aug
11

beatlesWhat I Was Reading:

While reading Haruki Murakami’s short story, “With the Beatles”, I was drawn in by the intimacy his prose can generate, and I asked myself how he was doing it? One rhetorical move I observed I’ve taken to calling, The Interrupting Self.

In this craft move the author offers a phrase to modify the phrase that came previously in order to be more precise and to indicate stream of consciousness. Consider this example from Haruki Murakami,

There’s one girl—a woman who used to be a girl, I mean—whom I remember well. I don’t know her name, though. And, naturally, I don’t know where she is now or what she’s doing. What I do know about her is that she went to the same high school as I did, and was in the same year (since the badge on her shirt was the same color as mine), and that she really liked The Beatles.

What Moves I Notice the Writer Making:

  • This move is made in the first sentence and the last. Murakami breaks into his own discourse to clarify that the girl is a woman now. In this way we learn where we are in time relative to the moment being remembered and it makes the prose conversational, as though the author were telling you what was on his mind. This interruption makes his communication feel more direct and immediate.
  • The second iteration is performed in a different way, brackets instead of dash, but it achieves the same effect. Here we are given the detail of the badge colour they shared, which focuses attention to a precise detail. From that detail we glean that Murakami’s speaker attended a school with a uniform. Again, this little aside evokes a conversational tone in the piece that feels like confession.
  • This piece does something else that I really like, which I call “Load the Last”. The above paragraph is taken from Murakami’s short piece, “With the Beatles.” So, bringing his meandering paragraph to its conclusion with this particular noun allows it to land with weight.

Possibilities for Writers:

  • I think the former of these two moves would be a great way for students to practice structured stream of consciousness writing. One exercise might be to write a simple line in a direct voice. Then, go back and insert a detail that reveals what your speaker is thinking in ‘real time’.
  • With the latter move, students should experiment. Try writing a paragraph with one important idea in mind. Provide supporting details throughout the middle of the paragraph, try to ‘land’ on that final word. This is a practical tactic that writers can use in a variety of writing forms.

Guest writer Scott Connelly’s experience with music, theater, and the performing arts, combined with his years of experience in corporate telecommunications, help to provide students with a variety of essential skills in literacy.  Scott teaches English Language Arts and Social Studies in Saint John, NB.

CRAFT STUDIO: THE BLADE ITSELF BY JOE ABERCROMBIE

Aug
04

bladeWhat I Was Reading:

In a wonderfully fun but hauntingly dark fantasy series, Abercrombie uses a trick throughout the trilogy to give us a unique perspective on one character, an Inquisitor (torturer) named Glokta, one of his primary point-of-view characters throughout the series. Normally adhering to the old principle of ‘show, don’t tell,’ Abercrombie avoids any kind of internal dialogue, letting the characters’ actions speak for themselves, but he makes an exception for Glokta – Glokta can walk and talk like any character, but he is the only one with an internal monologue, signified by italics:

‘Impressive, eh Inquisitor?’ he asked, before dissolving into a fit of coughing.
Not really.… ‘It certainly produces a great deal of smoke,’ he croaked.

What Moves I Notice the Writer Making:

This allows Glokta to speak to himself, but it also allows him (and Abercrombie) to speak directly to the reader. We get a clearer picture of his motives and desires, and it also says a great deal about his character – he is explicitly two-faced. In almost every interaction we see him say one thing but think another. It also speaks to his intellect. Thinking and conspiring are Glokta’s main occupations, and with this running internal monologue Abercrombie can show the reader Glokta doing it in real-time:

The old man squinted across at Glokta. ‘Are you telling this story or am I?’
‘You are.’ And you’re taking your time about it.

Possibilities for Writers:

Think of a time you were speaking with someone but couldn’t tell them what you were really thinking. What was going through your mind? How might you represent that on a page, while writing dialogue?

Find an example of a dialogue where a character had to hide their true motivations. What might they have been thinking during this scene?

Guest writer Matthew Shaw is an education student and a longtime teacher of English as a Second Language and a former archaeologist. He lives in Fredericton, NB with his wife and three-year-old son, and likes reading and spending as much time as possible outdoors with his family. He hates how much time he spends on YouTube every evening.

CRAFT STUDIO: THE PIGEON HAS FEELINGS, TOO! BY MO WILLEMS

Jul
21

PigeonWhat I Was Reading:

Mo Willems’ The Pigeon Has Feelings, Too! is a children’s book that tells the simple narrative of a pigeon who gets increasingly angry because those around him are constantly telling him what to do.

What Moves I Notice the Writer Making:

  • Using only speech bubbles to tell a story.
  • Emphasizing words by bolding and capitalizing letters.
  • Using different coloured texts, such as using red for the word ‘angry’ to grab attention.
  • Employing a variety of punctuation such as exclamation points.
  • Using body language to better express the intended message and emotion.

Possibilities for Writers:

  • When the message is being shown by illustration, such as in graphic novels and picture books, the illustration becomes the message. Explore body language and how posture and movement express emotion and intent, and ensure illustrations match the dialogue.
  • Have students find an existing text (their own or someone else’s) or write a new one, and pinpoint the words that they believe are important or best express what the writer is intending to get across. Explore ways to emphasize those words, such as using colours, different fonts, and bolding words.
  • Explore a variety of punctuation. Would an exclamation point or a semicolon work better than a period?

Guest writer Sylvie is a Bachelor of Education student at UNB hoping to become an English Language Arts teacher for a high school in or near her hometown. When not doing schoolwork she can be found with her partner, Samuel, enjoying a film (probably
horror), a cup of something hot (probably coffee), and/or whichever pet is closest
(probably Samuel’s doodles).

CRAFT STUDIO:SKELETONS BY IKKYU-SAN

Jul
07

What I Was Reading:

Ikkyu-san wrote a series of poems called “Skeletons” after falling asleep in a graveyard. He dreamt that the skeletons were all alive and living as they had when they still had flesh on their bones. One of them approached him and said the lines below. Ikkyu was one of the most prominent monks in Japanese history, yet he was irreverent about many things. He famously enjoyed alcohol and women until his end. He lived from 1394 to 1481.

This world
Is but
A fleeting dream
So why be alarmed
At its evanescence?

What Moves I Notice the Writer Making:

  • The author is trying to encourage the reader to forego any attachments to ‘this world’ and to embrace detachment.
  • He is sparing with his words and leaving pregnant pauses for dramatic effect.

Possibilities For Writers:

  • Ask students to write about all of the things that they feel ‘attached to’ in this world.
  • Ask students to write about all of the things they could easily live without.
  • Ask students to either agree with Ikkyu’s philosophy or disagree with it and give their examples/reasons.
  • Ask students to write about what advice someone who has died (either famous or personal) would likely give them.

Guest writer William Biolsi is an ESL/EFL teacher who spent 19 of his last 24 years living in East Asia. He is currently enrolled as a BEd student at the University of New Brunswick

CRAFT STUDIO:THE SWIM TEAM BY MIRANDA JULY

Jun
23

What I  Was Reading: 

swimteam

“The Swim Team” is the second story in Miranda July’s collection of short stories titled No one belongs here more than you. All of the stories in the collection are compelling due to the wildly imaginative inner lives of the usually lonely, bizarre, and socially outcast characters. While reading through the book, I noticed that July commonly excludes quotation marks to denote speech. In “The Swim Team”, this lack of punctuation serves a unique and interesting purpose. This story starts with a paragraph about how it is being written for the narrator’s ex-boyfriend in order to explain a specific time in her past that the ex-boyfriend had wanted to know about, and which may have contributed to their break-up. The story goes on to explain what happened during this secretive time and includes multiple characters speaking to each other without using quotation marks. The lack of quotation marks made me feel like I was not reading exactly what was said, but the narrator’s memory of what was said. Additionally, it made it so that the narrators voice was the only voice I heard while reading. In this way, the story sounded the way a story would if a friend was recounting an event that happened to them. This method of delivering the story made me feel a connection to the narrator, I was standing in for the ex-boyfriend and the narrator was telling her story to me.

SwimTeam1

What Moves I Notice the Writer Making:

  • No quotation marks to denote who is speaking and when
  • Lack of separation between dialogue and description
  • Writing as if recounting a story to a friend
  • Writing as if you are speaking to a fictional reader

Possibilities for Writers:

  • Write a story from your past as if you were telling the story to a friend
  • Try telling a story with dialogue from one character’s perspective without using quotation marks to separate the speakers
  • Write a fictional story from the perspective of a fictional character to another fictional character

Guest writer Julia Mortimer is currently a student teacher at UNB. When she is not busy studying she enjoys staring up at trees in hopes of seeing a bird, talking to her cat, and spending too much time wandering in grocery stores.

CRAFT STUDIO: GAME CHANGER BY TOMMY GREENWALD

Jun
09

What I Was Reading:

Game ChangerWhile I was reading Game Changer, I was struck by the many different ways Greenwald introduces different characters and dialogue without actually using any “traditional” writing styles. The story is about a thirteen-year-old boy who is in a coma from an injury on the football field, but the majority of the story circles around other characters who are trying to unpack what exactly happened to Teddy. We see a lot of different interactions with people within the story, and we get a lot of insight about how the characters are feeling about the protagonist’s journey, without getting an overload of information about them. I thought this was a very interesting and unconventional way to provide perspectives throughout the story.

Game Changer3Game Changer2Game Changer1

What Moves I Notice the Author Making:

  • Conversations are happening in messaging format with the dates and times of when they were said and by whom.
  • You can see what perspectives of the characters are more widely shared in the book by looking at the number of “likes” the message has.
  • There is no description given to the characters speaking, but instead information about who they are and how they are involved are happening through online discussion.
  • Updates on the protagonist are given through hospital reports, or through what he hears from the people around him while he is in a coma.
  • Ambiguity around the circumstances of his injury is heightened from the amount of characters giving opposing perspectives.

Possibilities for Writers:

  • Use one of the messaging conversations in Game Changer as a mentor text to get students to write out their own dialogue between 3 or more people. Have them use standard messaging techniques to provide meaning to the conversation.
  • Get students to write dialogue in a traditional sense, then have them try to take that same conversation and transfer it to a messaging platform – IMessage, Instagram, Facebook, Snapchat – How does it change between platforms?
  • Have students think of a time they heard a conversation that they were not a part of, and get them to come up with a way to express that dialogue without using standard quotations.
  • Using the Game Changer example of the hospital report, have students describe their current mood or situation in a similarly unique manner.

Guest writer Lauren Sieben is a UNB pre-service teacher currently interning with Sara BeLong in Grade 6 English at George Street Middle School. Game Changer combined two of her favourite things: reading YA and football.

CRAFT STUDIO: THE CURIOUS INCIDENT OF THE DOG IN THE NIGHT-TIME BY MARK HADDON

May
26

What I was Reading:

curiousThe curious incident of the dog in the night-time by Mark Haddon has many craft moves for writers to try. The narration and the way the novel is written is so unique and serves as a great mentor text for personal or instructional writing. The story is told from the perspective of Christopher, a neuro-diverse narrator who finds himself in the middle of a mystery he is determined to solve. While he brings the reader along on his quest, he spends a lot of time describing his unique feelings, beliefs, and quirks to us. In one section, he explains how he determines whether or not he will have a good day, while using a variety of techniques.

curious1

What Moves I Notice the Writer Making:

  • He writes his labels for his days in bolded type, so when he references them again it’s easier for the reader to remember his definition.
  • He integrates his definitions into a paragraph in an organized way.
  • He writes dialogue without using any quotation marks.
  • He uses longer sentences with minimal commas so that his writing sounds like how the narrator would speak.
  • He creates a comparison between his own superstitions and others’/his own father’s superstitions.

Possibilities for Writers:

  • Think about what constitutes a Good Day, Black Day, etc. in your own life and write about it, using this text and Haddon’s labels as inspiration.
  • Use the technique of bolding labels in your own writing.
  • Describe superstitions you have encountered in your own life and consider why you believe in them (or why you do not).

Guest writer Kristin Estabrooks is a Mount Allison University graduate, and is currently a student teacher studying for her Bachelor of Education at the University of New Brunswick in Fredericton. She is an avid reader who is now learning to read like a teacher of writing, and is looking forward to passing what she has learned on to her students.

CRAFT STUDIO: THE TRIALS OF APOLLO BY RICK RIORDAN

Apr
14

What I Was Reading:

apolloNow more than ever there are a plethora of great YA novels to get our students reading. One such series that also has the benefit of enjoying a movie adaptation is Rick Riordan’s Percy Jackson and the Lightning Thief. His spin off series The Trials of Apollo centers around the god Apollo losing his memories and becoming human. A strong recommendation for any students who like fantasy.

One of the things I really enjoyed was how every chapter begins with a haiku. These haikus, often humorously, foreshadow what is going to happen in the coming chapter. Not only is this a great writing move but it also pays homage to the source material. Many of the Greek myths and tales are either told through or prominently feature poetry in a number of ways: look back to Homer, Aeneid, and many of the Greek philosophers. So, given this is a story centered around gods and demi gods from the Greek pantheon, this is very fitting.

What Moves I Notice the Writer Making:

  • The haiku always foreshadows something that will happen in the chapter.
  • The haikus vary in tone and subject matter for every chapter.
  • They operate as an epiphany, a comment or a thought on the story.
  • They often use metatextual references or break the fourth wall.
  • They always follow the 5-7-5 convention.

Possibilities for Writers:

  • Provide students with a chapter of a book, short story, or video clip and have them write a haiku summarizing the content.
  • Provide the opposite: Provide them a haiku and have them write a narrative inspired by the content.
  • Have students provide haikus and/or writing to each other and for each others’ work.
  • Experiment with other poem structures to summarize a piece of writing or to function as an aside to what is happening (rhyming couplet, limerick, etc).
  • Encourage students to look into the genres they enjoy and employ something relevant to that genre, culture or tone. For example, introducing a science formula or a captain’s log entry at the beginning of a chapter of science fiction, a historical quote for a historical piece, or a text message exchange for a YA drama.

Guest writer Mitch Caissie is a nerd with a heart of gold and a head of hair, currently working through his Bachelor of Education and eagerly waiting to finish and begin his journey into teaching. He enjoys his wife, his pup, his video games, and his ability to speak in the third person.

CRAFT STUDIO: SISSY: A COMING OF GENDER STORY BY JACOB TOBIAS

Apr
02

What I Was Reading:

SissyI used to have a rainbow flag accessory on my phone, but it broke. My quick fix for making sure my students continue to be sure that I’m an ally of the LGBTQ++ community is to openly read very obviously queer novels. One of my favourites so far has been Sissy: A Coming of Gender Story by Jacob Tobias. It’s a hilarious and hard-hitting autobiography that discusses gender, sexuality, sex education, religion and all kinds of social issues that come along with growing up as a non-binary person within a society that upholds a restrictive gender binary.

What Moves I Notice the Writer Making:

Jacob Tobias’ voice comes through so clearly in their writing. One of the moves I see Jacob making to emphasize their voice in the book are the little faux-footnotes they sprinkle in. Instead of elaborating within the text, Jacob sometimes just inserts an asterix and explains or elaborates points in a little footnote at the bottom of the page. These footnotes range from explanations of words that the reader may not be familiar with to little additions to stories they tell in the text. These little additions are usually more informally written than the core text, which makes it feel like the author is adding in these details just for you, and makes the text feel even more authentic and personal than it already is.

Possibilities for Writers:

  • I mostly see this craft move as a way to insert additional ideas into a text without interrupting the flow of the main piece of writing.
  • When writers are writing about something they are an expert in, a faux-footnote would be a great way to throw in “fun facts” that might otherwise throw off the flow of a piece.
  • When writers are writing a more serious piece and are struggling to have their voice come through, this craft move could allow them to add in some humour/personality without interrupting the decorum of their writing.
  • When writers want to make sure readers understand the point they are making, a reiteration as a faux-footnote is a creative way to ensure readers understand the idea they’re trying to convey.
  • As Jacob uses them, faux-footnotes are also a great way to define a word that is necessary to use but may not be known to the piece’s audience.

My name is Caroline Wilson and I’m a student in the UNB faculty of Education. I love to be able to recommend all sorts of books to my students so I have been trying to fill my Non-Fiction book gap with memoirs like this one. I highly recommend this book to anyone looking to learn more about first-hand experiences in the queer community or about the gender binary.